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Gender Differences of Nutrition and Aging

We all age differently. A contributor to this is our gender. As we age we are also at increased risk for under-nutrition. Females are markedly at risk for undernutrition than males. Undernutrition increases one’s risk for:

1. Depression
2. Lower cognitive ability
3. Lower physical ability
4. Increased diagnosed diseases.

A way to combat this undernutrition is to eat with others. A Nutrition and Health Survey from Taiwan cited that when older men ate with others they were more likely to have higher meat and vegetable intakes and greater dietary quality than those who ate alone. It concluded that eating with others was an independent survival factor in older men. Providing a social aspect during meal time not only the increased quality of life but overall survival. Under nutrition may also occur because as we age it becomes more difficult to perform tasks such as meal planning, grocery trips, and cooking. If one is already not intaking adequate nutrition than the higher level cognitive tasks of meal planning and prepping may prove too much for them. This is where Perfect Solutions for Seniors can help. We understand the importance of good nutrition for the overall quality of life. Our caregiver’s and CNA’s will work with you to help you organize your meals, meal prep for you and even cook your meals.

 Call for a free in home consultation.

#homecare # inhomecare #caregiver #cna #companion #seniorinhomecare #sarasota #florida

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Seizures and Elderly

Seizures or medical term, epilepsy, is a neurological disorder marked by sudden recurrent episodes of sensory disturbance, loss of consciousness, or convulsions, associated with abnormal electrical activity in the brain.
3 Types of Seizures that can occur in the elderly and their symptoms are as follows :
Simple Partial Seizures
• Jamais vu ( familiar things suddenly become unfamiliar
• Trembling that moves up one side of the body
• Déjà vu
• Out of body experiences
• Sudden shifts in mood
• Unexplained anger or fear
• Disturbed speech
Complex Partial Seizures
• Lip smacking
• Lack of response to others
• Repeated phrases
• Senseless, clumsy movements
• Disrobing
• Being briefly unaware of danger or pain
Generalized Seizures
• Brief staring
• Sudden muscle contractions
• Sudden falls
• Convulsions
Here at PSFS, we gladly will attend all your Dr. appointments and become a liaison for you and your family if they cannot attend. As always, its our family taking care of yours.
#seizures #eldercare #seniorinhomecare #caregiver #CNA #homecare #sarasota #pinellas #tampabay #venice #perfectsolutionshomecare #dementiacare #dementiaawareness
@epilepsyfdn

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Dementia in Seniors with home care services

Dementia & Behaviors in Seniors

With Dementia, we may often see behaviors in an individual, secondary to that individuals frustration or inability to communicate effectively. There are often triggers of these behaviors.

Below is a helpful chart to assist you in recognizing what those triggers may be.





Untitled Document

Trigger Description What to Do?
Physical

Too hot or too cold?

Use bathroom?

Thirsty or hungry?

Check comfort – re position, assess skin temperature and remove sweater if hot add if cold.

Show toilet for visual cue, ask if has to toilet using words that they recognize (Pee, Poop, make water, BM, etc).

Show a snack or beverage when offering it.

Emotional

Person may isolate self when world is overwhelming.

Verbal outbursts- cursing, crying, screaming.

Shadow staff as fear being alone.

Provide one on one. Reassure them.

Let him/her shadow. It will not be for a long time.

Make sure you are providing body language that is welcoming such as smiling.

Tasks

Doing anything with too many steps.

Doing something unfamiliar.

Break tasks into small steps to match ability of the person.

Steps will need to become even smaller as the person declines in cognition.

When introducing a new task try to couple it with something familiar and slowly introduce the new part.

Communication

Difficulty expressing wants, thoughts, and needs.

Unable to understand others.

Help the person find the word to express their thoughts.

Provide them with two clear choices State a direction, wait for a response.

If person does not understand, add pictures.



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Happy Thanksgiving - Senior Home Care Sarasota

Inclusive Activities for Seniors during Thanksgiving

Holiday Activities & Home Care

Imagine your house full of people you love, endearing conversations being had between family members, loved ones yelling at the T.V. for sports games, children chasing each other from room to room developing life long friendships with their cousins. Sounds amazing right?

Now imagine you are a Senior, hard of hearing, trying to remember who these people are, attempting to remember “Why am I here again?”, “What are we celebrating?”. A family member asks you a question, and a well meaning daughter or spouse answers for you, robbing you of the opportunity for a social connection. The emotion is much different, right?

Holidays are a joyous occasion but can also be overwhelming for someone with Dementia or even someone who is hard of hearing. Here are some suggestions to help create a welcoming atmosphere:

  1. Have a photo album labeled with names, and reminisce with them multiple times a day with different family members who can offer different perspectives of the same story
  2. Incorporate your Senior in activities such as cooking. Have them sit at a table, and mix apples for the apple pie, or fold the napkin linens for the table.
  3. Have a room designated as a “quiet room”, where one-on-one conversations can be had without environmental distractions. This room is not meant to isolate a Senior, but to increase the social connection that is vital for their quality of life.
  4. Have a schedule ready to show them the events of the day so they are aware of what is next (this also helps you in organizing your day!)

We often see loved ones do everything for their Senior, thinking they are doing best for them, but often times we are handicapping them. Taking away what they still can do for themselves, and creating dependency. Seniors, even those with Dementia, can still contribute to daily activities, but just with some modified adjustments.

by: Francesca Alonso, M.S. CCC-SLP, Geriatric Speech Language Pathologist, Administrator of PSFS Homecare

 

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