Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA) Stroke in Seniors

Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA) Stroke in Seniors

One neurological disorder that can occur is a cerebral vascular accident (CVA) or commonly known as a stroke. A stroke can occur at any age, but the risk increases over the age of 65. According to the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), early action is key. Here are some signs and symptoms to look for if you or someone you know is experiencing a stroke:

  1. Numbness on side of the body
  2. Sudden confusion
  3. Sudden trouble with vision
  4. Sudden trouble walking, dizziness or loss of dizziness
  5. Sudden severe headache with no known cause

The CDC recommends to act F.A.S.T. and utilize the following simple test;

1. F-Face-Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

2. A-Arms-Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

3. S-Speech-Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is the speech slurred or strange?

4. T-Time- If you see any of these signs, call 911 right away.

At Perfect Solutions for Seniors, we recommend to have a list of all your doctor’s information on your refrigerator, so your family can have it readily accessible. www.cdc.gov

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Parkinson’s Dementia in Seniors

Parkinson’s Dementia in Seniors

In simplest terms, Parkinson’s Dementia in Seniors “PD” is a central nervous system disorder than can affect movement, often involving tremors. These tremors can be exhibit themselves in outer extremities such as legs and arms, or internally such as one’s larynx impacting their ability to swallow.

The Parkinson’s Foundation lists 10 early signs of “PD” Parkinson’s Dementia.

  1. Tremors
  2. Small Handwriting
  3. Loss of smell
  4. Trouble sleeping
  5. Trouble moving or walking
  6. Constipation
  7. A soft of low voice
  8. Masked face
  9. Dizziness or fainting
  10. Stooping or Hunching Over

If you or a loved one is experiencing these please schedule an appointment with your Doctor. For further information on Parkinson’s please visit Parkinson.org

#parkinsonsdisease #seniorcare #eldercare #homecare #seniorhomecare #caregiver #CNA #sarasotaseniorcare

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Alzheimer Blog - Perfect Solutions for Seniors Sarasota

Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Dementia in Seniors

According to the Alzheimer’s Association in 2018, 5.7 million Americans are living with AD. By 2050 that number is expected to rise to 14 million. “AD” Alzheimer’s Dementia in Seniors was first described in 1906, but it was not recognized as a common cause of dementia till 70 years later. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention define “AD” Alzheimer’s Dementia in Seniors “as a progressive disease beginning with mild memory loss possibly leading to loss of the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to the environment.” Age is the best known risk factor for AD, at this time.

10 Signs and Symptoms of “AD” Alzheimer’s Dementia in Seniors

  • Memory loss that disrupts daily life

  • Challenges in planning or solving problems

  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, or work or at leisure

  • Confusion with time and place

  • Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships

  • New problems with words in speaking or writing

  • Misplacing things and losing ability to retrace steps

  • Decreased or poor judgement

  • Withdrawal from work or social activities

  • Changes in mood or personality

If you notice these signs, schedule an appointment with your doctor. Remember, Dementia is NOT a normal part of the aging process.

dementiacare #perfectsolutionshomecare #seniorcare #eldercare #alzheimer’sdementia #dementia

@cdc @alzassociation

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Peripheral Neuropathy in Seniors

Peripheral Neuropathy in Seniors

Peripheral Neuropathy is a nerve disorder causing numbness stemming from your peripheral nerves. This could cause numbness or weakness usually in arms and feet. PN is separated into two different categories.

Common symptoms of sensory neuropathy include:

• Tingling.
• Numbness, especially in the hands and feet.
• Changes in sensation — Some people feel severe pain, especially at night, and some are unable to feel pain, pressure, temperature, or touch.
• Loss of coordination.
• Loss of reflexes.
• Burning sensation.
• Feeling that you are wearing socks or gloves when you are not.

Common symptoms of motor Neuropathy include:

• Muscle weakness.
• Difficulty walking or moving your arms or legs.
• Muscle twitching.
• Cramps.
• Spasms.
• Loss of muscle control.
• Loss of muscle tone.
• Loss of dexterity.
• Falling.
• Inability to move a part of the body.

PN could impact walking and other abilities that may affect your quality of life. If you or someone you know needs assistance in your home with activities of daily living, personal care or travel to Dr. appointments, call us!

#seniorcare #dementia #inhomecare #eldercare #CNA #alzheimercareforseniors #besthomecareagency #homecarenearme

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Neurological Disorders and Aging in Seniors - Homecare Sarasota Blog

Neurological Disorders and Aging in Seniors

As we age, changes occur in our bodies. There are things we can noticeably see, such as hair color, but changes are occurring within the body as well.

Our brain and central nervous system are experiencing changes as well, this is why a person is more likely to suffer a neurological issue over the age of 65.

Here are some of the most common neurological disorders that affect seniors and may require senior home-care:

  1. Stroke or medical known as a Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA)- this occurs when a part of the blood supply to the brain is being blocked, such as a clot.
  2. Neuropathy- nerve disorder causing numbness
  3. Alzheimer’s Disease- progressive diseases that destroys the cells in the brain
  4. Parkinson’s Disease- a chronic and progressive movement disorder
  5. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis- (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. This is progressive disease affecting motor neurons and causes deterioration of a muscle’s function. Any of these affects a person’s quality of life and they may need assistance in their homes.

Here, at Perfect Solutions for Seniors, we provide a free in-home consultation and work within your budget for 24 hour or as needed senior home-care in Sarasota. We do not want a person’s financial income to hinder care.

 

#seniorcare #dementia #inhomecare #eldercare #CNA #alzheimercareforseniors #besthomecareagency #homecarenearme

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Christmas Activities for Seniors

Christmas Activities for Seniors

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year! Christmas week is upon us. Here is a list of activities to engage your Senior during the Holiday Season.

  1. Watch an old time Christmas movie. White Christmas with Bing Crosby will surely bring back wonderful memories. Remember to put volume on a little bit louder, and check their hearing aids to ensure they are working properly.

  2. Wrap Presents! While they are assisting you with wrapping, ask them questions about their favorite Christmas memory, and lead them down memory lane.

  3. Go see Christmas lights! Nothing brings out more joy then beautiful Christmas lights twinkling. Google Christmas lights in your area, and it will guide you to the best spots. Some neighborhoods even have contests to see who can have the best lights. Can you spot the winner?

  4. Have a warm cup of tea with them, gather the kids around and read classic Christmas Stories. Our favorite is “ A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens. Creating Memories is the best part of the season. Enjoy with your loved ones, live in the moment, and cherish life.

    Happy Holidays, from our Family to Yours!

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Dementia in Seniors with home care services

Dementia & Behaviors in Seniors

With Dementia, we may often see behaviors in an individual, secondary to that individuals frustration or inability to communicate effectively. There are often triggers of these behaviors.

Below is a helpful chart to assist you in recognizing what those triggers may be.





Untitled Document

Trigger Description What to Do?
Physical

Too hot or too cold?

Use bathroom?

Thirsty or hungry?

Check comfort – re position, assess skin temperature and remove sweater if hot add if cold.

Show toilet for visual cue, ask if has to toilet using words that they recognize (Pee, Poop, make water, BM, etc).

Show a snack or beverage when offering it.

Emotional

Person may isolate self when world is overwhelming.

Verbal outbursts- cursing, crying, screaming.

Shadow staff as fear being alone.

Provide one on one. Reassure them.

Let him/her shadow. It will not be for a long time.

Make sure you are providing body language that is welcoming such as smiling.

Tasks

Doing anything with too many steps.

Doing something unfamiliar.

Break tasks into small steps to match ability of the person.

Steps will need to become even smaller as the person declines in cognition.

When introducing a new task try to couple it with something familiar and slowly introduce the new part.

Communication

Difficulty expressing wants, thoughts, and needs.

Unable to understand others.

Help the person find the word to express their thoughts.

Provide them with two clear choices State a direction, wait for a response.

If person does not understand, add pictures.



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Happy Thanksgiving - Senior Home Care Sarasota

Inclusive Activities for Seniors during Thanksgiving

Holiday Activities & Home Care

Imagine your house full of people you love, endearing conversations being had between family members, loved ones yelling at the T.V. for sports games, children chasing each other from room to room developing life long friendships with their cousins. Sounds amazing right?

Now imagine you are a Senior, hard of hearing, trying to remember who these people are, attempting to remember “Why am I here again?”, “What are we celebrating?”. A family member asks you a question, and a well meaning daughter or spouse answers for you, robbing you of the opportunity for a social connection. The emotion is much different, right?

Holidays are a joyous occasion but can also be overwhelming for someone with Dementia or even someone who is hard of hearing. Here are some suggestions to help create a welcoming atmosphere:

  1. Have a photo album labeled with names, and reminisce with them multiple times a day with different family members who can offer different perspectives of the same story
  2. Incorporate your Senior in activities such as cooking. Have them sit at a table, and mix apples for the apple pie, or fold the napkin linens for the table.
  3. Have a room designated as a “quiet room”, where one-on-one conversations can be had without environmental distractions. This room is not meant to isolate a Senior, but to increase the social connection that is vital for their quality of life.
  4. Have a schedule ready to show them the events of the day so they are aware of what is next (this also helps you in organizing your day!)

We often see loved ones do everything for their Senior, thinking they are doing best for them, but often times we are handicapping them. Taking away what they still can do for themselves, and creating dependency. Seniors, even those with Dementia, can still contribute to daily activities, but just with some modified adjustments.

by: Francesca Alonso, M.S. CCC-SLP, Geriatric Speech Language Pathologist, Administrator of PSFS Homecare

 

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Francesca Senior care in Sarasota

Communication Tips for people with Dementia

Here are some useful tips to effectively communicate with a person with dementia. Communication is not a one size fits all, so please tailor your approach to each individual, and remember sometimes its not WHAT you say but HOW you say it.

Begin by Setting a Positive Mood- Your attitude and body language communicate stronger than words.

Be sure to get the persons attention-Limit distractions and noise. Address client by name, identify yourself by name and use non verbal cues and touch to help client stay focused. If client is seated, get down to her level and maintain eye contact.

State your Message clearly. Speak slowly, and distinctly and in a reassuring tone while using simple words and sentences. Ask simple, specific, answerable questions. Only ask one question at a time. Questions with yes or no answers work best. Give instructions that are easy to understand. Break down tasks into simple 2-3 simple steps

Adjust your expectations. Respond with affection and reassurance. Do not use “remember”. Do not test their memory or tell them of their deficits.

When the going gets tough, distract and redirect. By redirecting an individual with dementia, you may be able to avoid or delay outbursts or inappropriate behaviors.

Use validation.  Use humor whenever possible.

* From Linda Burhans “Good Nightand God Bless”

Francesca Alonso (pictured above) is a licensed Geriatric Speech Language Pathologist. She has training in management in Dementia care and is on track to becoming a Certified Dementia Practitioner (CDP).

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